Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia Tourist Attractions and Travel

The Sydney Opera House is located in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It is one of the most distinctive and famous 20th century buildings, and one of the most famous performing arts venues in the world. Situated on Bennelong Point in Sydney Harbour, with parkland to its south and close to the equally famous Sydney Harbour Bridge, the building and its surroundings form an iconic Australian image. The Sydney Opera House is one of the most famous buildings in the world. It is considered to be one of the most recognizable images of the Sydney Opera House Travel modern world although the building has been open for only about 30 years.The Sydney Opera House is as representative of Australia as the pyramids are of Egypt.

Sydney Opera House travel, Sydney, Australia Tourist Attractions

6 225 square meters of glass and 645 kilometers of electric cable were used to build the Opera House.It includes 1 000 rooms.It is 185 meters long and 120 meters wide.The building's roof sections weigh about 15 tons.There are 1 million tiles on the roof.It provides guided tours to 200 000 people each year.

Sydney Opera House picture, Sydney, Australia

Sydney Opera House attractions

Sydney Opera House must be one of the most recognisable images of the modern world - up there with the Eiffel Tower and the Empire State Building - and one of the most photographed.

 

Not only is it recognisable, it has come to represent 'Australia'. Although only having been open since 1973, it is as representative of Australia as the pyramids are of Egypt and the Colosseum of Rome. The Opera House is situated on Bennelong Point, which reaches out into the harbour. The skyline of the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the blue water of the harbour and the Sydney Opera House, viewed from a ferry or from the air, is dramatic and unforgettable. London tower bridge

 

Ironic, perhaps, that this Australian icon - the Opera House with a roof evocative of a ship at full sail - was designed by renowned Danish architect - Jørn Utzon. In the late 1950s the NSW Government established an appeal fund to finance the construction of the Sydney Opera House, and conducted a competition for its design. Utzon's design was chosen. The irony was that his design was, arguably, beyond the capabilities of engineering of the Sydney Opera House Travel time. Utzon spent a couple of years reworking the design and it was 1961 before he had solved the problem of how to build the distinguishing feature - the 'sails' of the roof.

 Sydney Opera House tourism

Sydney Opera House from the harbour, photo courtesy of Andrew Watts The venture experienced cost blow-outs and there were occasions when the NSW Government was tempted to call a halt. In 1966 the situation - with arguments about cost and the interior design, and the Government withholding progress payments - reached crisis point and Jørn Utzon resigned from the project. The building was eventually completed by others in 1973.

 

But do you know the Opera House with a roof was designed by a famous Danish architect, Utzon?In the late 1950s the Australian Government established an appeal fund to finance the construction of the Sydney Opera House, and conducted a competition for its design was chosen.Utzon spent a few years reworking the design and it was 1961 before he had solved the problem of how to build the distinguishing feature—the sails of the roof.The venture experienced cost blowouts.In 1966 the Sydney Opera House Attractions situation reached crisis point and Utzon resigned from the project.The building was finally competed by others in 1973.Sydney Opera House was opened by Queen Elizabeth on 20th October 1973.

 

The Opera House reaches out into the harbour.Seen from the air or a ferry, the skyline of the Sydney Opera Hose, the blue water of the harbour and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, is beautiful. To some, the spherical-sectioned shells are reminiscent of the flotilla of sailboats commonly cruising there. It is a major tourist attraction even though most visitors have little interest in attending performances.

 

As well as many touring theatre, ballet, and musical productions, the Opera House is the home of Opera Australia, the Sydney Theatre Company and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra. It is administered by the Opera House Trust, under the New South Wales Ministry of the Arts. SYDNEY, Australia -- Around every bend in Australia, there are natural beauties and magnificent vistas. But perhaps nothing identifies the country more than a breathtaking view of the Sydney Opera House. The Opera House, designed by Danish architect Jørn Utzon, is lauded by many as one of the architectural wonders of the modern world. It attracts 90 percent of tourists who visit Sydney and acts as a major home to the performing arts in Australia.

 Sydney Opera House attractions

The site of the opera house is some 500 yards from where the first European colonists landed in 1788. Fort Macquarie was established there at Bennelong Point in 1821. A tram depot came along in 1902. Trams were phased out in the 1950s, not long after Sydney Symphony Orchestra conductor Eugene Goossens began actively floating the idea of a concert hall. A government official seized on the concept and established an advisory committee, which selected the site of the old tram shed as the new home of the Sydney Opera House.

 

In 1956, the government announced an international design competition. Utzon won the next year with his distinctive "soaring sails" vision of a harborside center. He said his idea for the structure had come from a simple source: the orange. "All the shells are cut out of the same sphere," says Michael Lynch, chief executive of the Opera House Trust, "and now all have a common denominator." In an interesting aside, renowned American architect Frank Lloyd Wright didn't approve of the blueprints. "The circus tent is not architecture," Wright said.

  Sydney Opera House tourism

Construction of the Opera House took almost a decade and a half, and cost US $66 million, more than 14 times original projections
Construction began in 1959. It was supposed to take four years and cost $7 million Australian (US $4.7 million) -- to be paid from lottery revenues. That turned out to be an unrealistic figure. "They went through extraordinary difficulty in trying to make the building work," Lynch says. "The sails themselves are all made out of pre-stressed concrete at a point where that was pretty much cutting-edge technology."

 

Construction wasn't finished until 14 years later in 1973, with a $100 million Australian (US $66 million) price tag. Utzon didn't stick around for the completion. He left in 1966, disgusted with changes the New South Wales Sydney Opera House Tourism government wanted to make to his design -- as early as the first year of construction, for example, officials had demanded he double the number of performance spaces in the facility.

 Sydney Opera House travel

Sydney Opera House facts and figures

 The Sydney Opera house:

 

Was designed by Danish architect Jørn Utzon.
Was opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 20 October 1973.
Presented, as its first performance, The Australian Opera's production of War and Peace by Prokofiev.
Cost $AU 102,000,000 to build.
Conducts 3000 events each year.
Provides guided tours to 200,000 people each year.
Has an annual audience of 2 million for its performances.
Includes 1000 rooms.
Is 185 metres long and 120 metres wide.
Has 2194 pre-cast concrete sections as its roof.
Has roof sections weighing up to 15 tons.
Has roof sections held together by 350 kms of tensioned steel cable.
Has over 1 million tiles on the roof.
Uses 6225 square metres of glass and 645 kilometres of electric cable.

Sydney Opera House, Sydney, Australia Tourist Attractions

The ceiling of the Opera House. The architect said the design concept came from an orange: 'Shells ... cut out of the same sphere'
The complex boasts several performance halls that carry every genre of entertainment, from jazz to ballet. An estimated 3,000 performances each year are seen by about two million people.

 

Visitors are drawn to more than the performances. The complex holds cafes and shops, too. Today, more than 300,000 visitors tour the opera house each year.



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